December 6, 2022
Each day, we have millions of people submitting posts on Reddit from all around the globe. Be it content, comments, or more- the platform is always booming.

The famous social media app is adored by plenty and the fact that it’s been in business for the last 17 years and more is truly eye-opening. And with time, the popularity doesn’t appear to be dwindling. Instead, it’s increasing.

With a rise in visitor numbers, there’s also been another unique observation that deserves special mention. We’re seeing the number of takedown requests coming from the DMCA skyrocket to explosive levels. Think along the lines of 15,000%.

So, where are these sudden glimpses of the app’s takedown volumes coming from? Well, it has to do with the platform’s most recent ban of its Pirated Games. And we won’t lie by saying the results are really eye-opening.

We’re seeing startling data where content removal went from about 4,400 to 666,000 over a span of just five years. And to be more specific, we’re talking about a massive 15,000% rise.

The greatest rise in figures, percentage-wise, took place during the early years. However, it’s interesting to note that the trend won’t be seeing a reversal anytime soon.

The news comes to us by TorrentFreak which found that the more you travel back in time, the difference keeps getting bigger.

In 2014, Reddit saw takedowns comprising just 66 posts. But obviously, over the years, the app became more popular and so the target audience increased with growing members.

Three years back, Reddit outlined through transparency reports what the figures of its banned members and banned posts were. It was an interesting insight and the trend has really escalated to new levels.

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A graph outlining the changes made over the years proves how takedown requests spiraled when the number of users and subreddit ban increased. And the greatest change was last year. Now, experts are curious to see if this particular trend continues or not.

As of now, we know very well that the platform’s hands are full and they’re complying with all the changes being outlined with the DMCA. There have been billions of posts from users that don’t meet the criteria and hence need to be removed. And we don’t see it to be a huge surprise.

But we do feel it’s important to always have a check on what’s really going on in the app through its efforts with transparency reports.

Read next: Reddit’s Developing A New Platform Via Which Users Will Be Able To More Easily Make Bots And Extensions